RootsTech 2014

Some people eat, sleep and chew gum, I do genealogy and write...

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Suggest a Blog Topic

If you have been reading my blog for a while, you may recall some topic that I have not fully covered. I always appreciate comments and many of the comments lead to subsequent blog posts. But for a change, I thought I would ask my readers for topics they would like to see me talk about. So, if you have been wishing for a post on something dear to your heart, let me know and I will schedule it for an upcoming blog post. Thanks for all you out there who read my blog. I enjoy writing it and hope to keep going for a long time.

No, I am not running out of things to say, I have a very long list of topics. But I did think it might be a good idea to ask.

13 comments:

  1. The "internationalisation" of genealogy.
    Not only language barriers, but the invisible brick walls. Different approaches and feelings towards genealogy (for example in Germany it can be a very touchy subject - because of the nazis and their "pure blood" "Ahnenkult"), different forms of genealogical societies and organisations, different understanding of documenting maybe? Interesting non-English projects that are great resources but don't get noticed. (Think along the lines of the German GOV project. http://gov.genealogy.net/search/index)
    Also what interesting and unique approaches non-English speaking cultures could bring to genealogy - think Arabic tradition, Chinese/Asian tradition.
    Being German and having an American grandfather, I see a lot of brick walls that seem to be invisible to Americans. Maybe you as an American see brick walls I cannot see?
    You with your experience working with many patrons could have some interesting perspective on this subject. I'd enjoy reading you write about this.

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    1. Thanks for the ideas. I looked at your blog and will subscribe now to your posts. Thanks again.

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  2. I am new to genealogy so this may be pretty elementary questions. I would like to know the best resources to get copies of birth and death certificates, free if possible. Also, would like to find out the best way to obtain information from a church my ancestors attended and then what to do with that information. Thank you for your blog. It has been very helpful.

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    1. Good idea to remind me of some basics. Thanks for the suggestions.

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  3. I'm not from Mormondom, but am a Mormon (I was raised in Kentucky). I'd like a better understanding of why so many people in Mormondom dislike family history. In Kentucky, it was usually adult men who were not interested in genealogy. Adult women were more interested. Boring? All done? For geeks? Irrelevant? Would rather look to the future, than the past? Too hard? Too many pushy people telling them to do it? I'd love to hear your fount of wisdom on the matter.

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    1. Good ideas. Now I have a long list of things to talk about.

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  4. New Tool for Genealogy Research? Has Someone Died in Your House

    There has been a recent website created.
    Died In House – Has Someone Died in Your House
    http://www.diedinhouse.com/

    It is not promoted as a genealogy tool; however, it seems to me that anyone having any residential location in the United States, could clearly benefit, by obtaining a home history; relatives and occupants.
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/10/19/newser-died-in-house/3025953/

    The Died in House service is the first of its kind; it provides users with death records associated to a specific address. This seems to have tremendous potential, for the genealogy and family history community, especially for close knit neighborhoods, considering data obtained from obituary notices and death certificates.
    http://www.diedinhouse.com/AboutUs

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    1. Wow, remarkable idea. I will look into it.

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  5. I'd like to suggest a generalisation of this topic James. There is a homes-based collaborative site in UK too called http://www.myhomespast.co.uk/.

    I mentioned this once before at https://plus.google.com/+TonyProctor/posts/HC7RWSKHoEx#+TonyProctor/posts/HC7RWSKHoEx since it sounds good but it has some directional issues.

    It is not currently viewed by its creators in terms of micro-history or social networking but the scope for collaborating on your old streets, and for finding your old neighbours, is potentially huge.

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    1. That site will help with the overall topic. Thanks.

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  6. I would like to see a blog post on how to present Family History / Genealogy to younger people. I am to give a presentation to a group of teens and want to make it interesting and enticing to the younger set. There are sites with suggestions for children and I have read through what is on Family Search for this topic.
    Nan

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    1. Thanks, I'm not quite sure I would have anything to add except here is a link to a new book with lots of really good ideas
      https://zapthegrandmagap.com/
      This is also listed as one of the certified products on FamilySearch.org

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  7. How about a citation guide for the genealogy lay person with some common examples? It seems like there is a big push (rightfully so) to encourage the lay person to cite sources but little information as to how to do so in a proper format. Or perhaps you could just point out some useful sites with this information. Thanks.

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